January 2009

Issue 29

 

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CNF

Creative Nonfiction Magazine

 

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THE BLUEST EYE
By Lance Larsen

Without warning, as if following some Biblical injunction, the boy reached in and plucked out his left eye. 

BEYOND CHAGRIN
By David Bradley

I had a sixth-grade reading level, but only a second-grade bladder, and the script called for the WOLF to lurk in every scene.

JIMI DON'T PLAY HERE NO MORE
By Tim Elhajj

"You got high today?" Americo scowled. Instead of sending me to the Bronx, he sent me to a shelter downtown. "Get outta here," he said.

FUTURE EX BUYS PAJAMAS
By John Bresland

Parisians. They murmur like little doves. They cluck and they coo. No matter how long we end up living here, I know I'll never learn to speak that way.

NEW CRAFT ESSAYS from Lisa Knopp and Brenda Miller looking at 'Perhapsing' and at letter writing as a form of contemplative practice, plus a bonus Brevity podcast.

YOU LIKE IT DON'T YOU,
YOU LIKE IT HARD AND COLD
By Diane Seuss

...well let me introduce you to the state line dairy where the cherries in the sherbet are harvested from virgins and the girls filling the cones all have boyfriends in vietnam ...

CATHY OR KATY
By Joe Bonomo

Later that night I stared at Cathy or Katy and the thousands of freckles on her cheeks, the way her loose hair caught light from the desk lamp by the bed.  She sat utterly unkempt, breaking my heart with every shift of her leg, or sip of her drink.

SUSPENDED
By Kyle Minor

“You think you’re something,” he said, and lifted me until my feet were off the ground. “You ever run crying on my brother again, I’ll beat you within an inch of your life, you hear me?

THE CRAB IN THE STARS
By Laura Sewell Matter

My grandfather is sick.  He has been for a year.  For a few weeks now, he has hardly eaten, and for a few days, he has been unable to blink, so my grandmother applies tears to his eyes.

TENDERNESS
By Elizabeth Westmark

Ronnie's longish hair stuck out from beneath the ubiquitous cap of the workingman, his dirty blonde mustache shot through with gray.  A potent mix of tobacco, diesel fuel and yesterday's work clothes entered the house fast as a stray cat when I opened the door.

HILL STREET BLUES
By Bryan Fry

My mother and father are fighting in their bedroom in Great Falls, Montana.  My mother opens a package of cigarettes, and the clear cellophane spills out over their bed.  My father seems gentle.  He is pleading with her.  My mother screams. 

BOOK REVIEWS

Reviews of three new books: Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Infidel, Richard Todd's The Thing Itself: On the Search for Authenticity and Kim Sunee's Trail of Crumbs: Hunger, Love, and the Search for Home, from Mary Richert, Richard Gilbert, and Stephanie Susnjara.