• Price $15.95

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    Same Time Next Week

    True Stories of Working Through Mental Illness

    In any given year, one in four Americans suffer from a diagnosable mental illness--and yet there is still a significant stigma attached to being labeled as "mentally ill." We hear about worse-case scenarios, but in many--maybe even most--cases, there is much room for hope.

    The 18 frank, often intimate true stories collected in Same Time Next Week highlight the need for empathy and compassion between therapist and patient, and argues for a system that encourages human connection rather than diagnosis by checklist.

    "Hope for those seeking help." - Booklist

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    True Stories, Well Told

    from the First 20 Years of Creative Nonfiction Magazine

    "Whether inducing tears or raucous laughter, all the pieces are inviting, inquisitive and attentive—and sure to spark plenty of imaginations." - Kirkus Review

    "Intelligent, polished, surprising essays that will have you wiping away tears one moment, laughing out loud the next. An indispensable resource for writers, teachers, and those who simply love to read true stories, well told." - Dinty W. Moore

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    True Crime

    Real-life Stories of Grave-robbing, Identity Theft, Abduction, Addiction, Obsession, Murder, and More

    "True Crime is an anthology of mayhem and menace that won't make you embarrassed about reading true crime stories. In fact, you'll be moved enough by the sheer quality of the writing to wonder how anyone's imagination could stack up against reality…."

    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

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    I Wasn't Strong Like This When I Started Out

    True Stories of Becoming a Nurse

    This collection of true narratives reflects the dynamism and diversity of nurses, who provide the first vital line of patient care.

  • Price $15.95

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    At the End of Life

    True Stories About How We Die

    The modern healthcare system has become proficient at staving off death with aggressive interventions. And yet, eventually everyone diesand although most Americans say they would prefer to die peacefully at home, more than half of all deaths take place in hospitals or health care facilities. At the End of Life tackles this conundrum head on. These twenty-two compelling personal-medical narratives explore death, dying and palliative care, and reveal the inner workings of a system in which doctors, patients and their loved ones battle to hang onand to let go. 

Best Sellers, New & Notable

Same Time Next Week

Edited by Lee Gutkind

In any given year, one in four Americans suffer from a diagnosable mental illness--and yet there is still a significant stigma attached to... more

True Stories, Well Told

Edited by Lee Gutkind & Hattie Fletcher

"Whether inducing tears or raucous laughter, all the pieces are inviting, inquisitive and attentive—and sure to spark plenty of... more

I Wasn't Strong Like This When I Started Out

Edited by Lee Gutkind

This collection of true narratives reflects the dynamism and diversity of nurses, who provide the first vital line of patient care. more

You Can't Make This Stuff Up

Lee Gutkind

Lee Gutkind, the go-to expert for all things creative nonfiction, taps into one of the fastest-growing genres with this new writing guide.... more

At the End of Life

Edited by Lee Gutkind

The modern healthcare system has become proficient at staving off death with aggressive interventions. And yet, eventually everyone dies... more

The Best Creative Nonfiction Series Box Set

Lee Gutkind

Together—or, for that matter, separately—the Best Creative Nonfiction collections are a crash-course in the genre, with... more

Books

Excerpts

Why Creative Nonfiction Matters

True Stories, Well Told

Lee Gutkind and Hattie Fletcher

Unlike big, glossy magazines, “little” or literary magazines like Creative Nonfiction are often labors of love—underfunded, understaffed, and often, for these reasons, short-lived. A while back, Charles McGrath pointed out in the New York Times that “the typical lifespan for a literary magazine appears to be roughly that of a major household appliance: anything over 10 years is gravy.” Incredibly, as we write this Creative Nonfiction is celebrating its twentieth... more

Sin

Southern Sin

Dorothy Allison

When I was a girl one of the many games my cousins and I played was one I called “worthless sinner.” The competition centered on who among us was the biggest, and therefore most worthless, sinner. “I stole change out of mama’s pocket book.” “I drank off half the whiskey in the bottle Uncle Jack keeps in that paper bag in his glove compartment.” “I trampled Aunt Dot’s tomato plants!” “I watched cousin Bobbie having sex with... more

Bad Men Do What Good Men Dream?

True Crime

Lee Gutkind

When I was a teenager, I had two friends—Glick and Girson—who committed murder while robbing a mom-and-pop grocery store. This took place in Squirrel Hill, the well-to-do Pittsburgh neighborhood where I grew up, near the lovely, sprawling Frick Park and a short walk from the high school from which all three of us had recently graduated. The two old people who ran the store, Mr. and Mrs. Cua, were notoriously cranky, which made kids visit their store more often than necessary just to... more