Fall 2009

Issue 31

 

 


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Creative Nonfiction Magazine

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SOMEBODY ELSE'S GENOCIDE
By Sherman Alexie

A white woman, waiting in line behind the German, gasped and slapped her hand to her mouth. A black woman turned on her heel and fled. For one of the few times in my life, I was silenced.

SWERVE
By Brenda Miller

 A  pound of marijuana in the trunk and a faulty brake light—any minute the cops might have pulled us over, so you were edgy already, and then I ran over that piece of stray lumber without even slowing down.

SNAKES
By Ron Arias

I'm waiting in the entryway of the place where I'm staying, waiting for someone to pick me up and take me to interview the country's young leader, Daniel Ortega. All I'm told is to be ready to run.

THIS IS NOT TO SAY
By Amy Lee Scott

Or maybe it was about something entirely different: the unfolding of ironed laundry. The grout going black between bathroom tiles. The casting of kites into a thunder capped sky.

NEW CRAFT ESSAYS

In our Craft Section, Stephen Corey, Dinah Lenney, Jennifer Culkin, and Towles Kintz look at the art of blogging, the rewards of memoir, and (from two perspectives) the absolute value of careful editing. One of our strongest Craft quartets ever.

TWAN'T MUCH
By Lee Martin

He bowed his head. He held that platter in his big hands, calloused and scarred, the knuckles all knobbed up, and he mumbled, “Much obliged.” Then he walked away, leaving me to feel the embarrassment I’d caused him, the shame.

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
By Rebecca Frost

The numb feeling inside as she sets the vase on the ground and kneels next to it is an old friend.  The numbness of winter, of denial, of broken dreams and the word forever spoken and then retracted.  She doesn’t know how to destroy, but she knows how to be numb.

WQED, Channel 13: PROGRAMMING GUIDE
By Ann Claycomb

This morning you have been The Joker, Cat Woman, Wonder Woman, Supergirl, and a lost kitty’s mommy.  You have been mean and turned nice, been nice and turned mean, died and come back to life.  You are exhausted. 

VITAMIN M
By Jehanne Dubrow

On my side of the family, we make an art form of complaint.  Although we no longer speak the mother tongue of Yiddish, we still cherish our infirmities as though they are silver candlesticks smuggled over from the Old Country.

PHEASANT
By Scott Moncrieff

As I heard the story she liked him but she wasn’t sure, so Gideon-like she asked “Lord, give me a sign,” and just to make sure the deity was authentically involved she said “make it a sign with a pheasant.”

THE POTATO HARVEST
By April Monroe

Potatoes love one heavy frost. It gives them weight and tough skins, and prepares them for the long months in the cellar. But two hard frosts will kill them, so the harvest contains  uncertain urgency.

NEW BOOK REVIEWS

On our Book Review page, Karen Babine discusses Best American Essays 2009, Stephanie Susnjara looks at S. L. Wisenberg's The Adventures of Cancer Bitch, J. Luise reviews Emmanuel Guibert’s The Photographer: Into War-torn Afghanistan with Doctors Without Borders, and Dinty W. Moore offers his thoughts on Brenda Miller's Blessing of the Animals.